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Sharon1927
Reply with quote  #1 
Has anybody tried using a mechanical manure sifter and/or shaker?  I have been looking into purchasing one but there are so many on the market...I'm not sure which model works the best.  There's the Stall Butler, The Shaker, The Poop Shaker, etc.  Do they really work and has anybody had any mechanical problems with them?
stacy
Reply with quote  #2 
the only shaker I have tried has been my two hand/arm/future fork combo. Tendinitis the only complaint
Sharon
Reply with quote  #3 
Ha!  Well, tendonitis is what I'm trying to avoid.  I used to work as a dog groomer and eventually I had to quit because it was so hard on my body, particularly my hands.  My husband came across the Stall Butler on the internet and was intrigued by it.  All the machines have pretty hefty pricetags though, so I was hoping to get some feedback from people before investing in it.
KellyO
Reply with quote  #4 
I saw them demo'd at a horse fair earlier this year.  I thought it was a cool concept.  But after going back to my barn and cleaning a stall manually, I'm not sure how it will really make things easier. You still have to scoop up the bedding and hold it in the air.   You now control the shaking, but with this,  you'll still be holding the implement the same way, but now IT controls the shaking.  I also think it will make the implement heavier to lift.

If you still want to try it, order the one with the best return policy.
Sharon
Reply with quote  #5 
Kelly, I believe I've seen the manure fork you are referring to - the one with a trigger on the end that shakes the tines of the fork?  I agree with you in that I really don't see how that would help. 

What I am looking into purchasing is an actual machine that you wheel into the stall.  It's based on the same design as a soil sifter I think.  You still have to use a fork or shovel to get the shavings into the bed of the thing, but it does the shaking and sifting for you, which supposedly makes it easier on the arms.  Here's the link for one of the models I'm looking at:

http://www.morristool.com/mtshakerlarge2.htm
Connie
Reply with quote  #6 
We have had the StallShifter for two years now and clean about 30 stalls with it every day.  Couldn't live without it!!! We have cleaner stalls as it gets every little piece of manure and deposits it into the muck bucket.  You do have to get the wet stuff out first, so we prep the stall, taking out the wet and piling the rest into two piles on either side of the stall.  We then roll "Mr. Shaky" into the stall and start shoveling.  Does have a few drawbacks - soiled hay can slow down the process so we try to get that out with the wet, and since the sawdust is infused with oxygen as it is sifted every day, the sawdust has a tendancy to darkin faster from oxidation.  This makes the sawdust look wet, but it isn't.  Thought that would create a problem with our boarders, but since we are able to bed deeper and they see that the stalls really are cleaner, they are happy.  We don't use the machine with some horses that are really neat because it is just as easy to take out the bad stuff by hand, but I wouldn't want to have to clean the measy ones, the ones that grind the manure into the bedding, without the machine.  Haven't seen too much of a differance in saving on sawdust or time, but the damage to our bodies, including tendonitis and carpal tunnel, has been decreased tremendously.  I recommend it totally and I wish I had just bit the bullet and bought it when I first opened our boarding stable 12 years ago. 
Eleventh Hour Farm & Eque
Reply with quote  #7 
I can recommend the StallShifter 1000%!!   (from Brockwood Farms- Harry Hopkins-Owner)

I've used one every day for 9 years doing 24 stalls 365 days a year.  In fact I finally just bought a new one about 2 months ago.  It's the ONLY way to clean stalls.  As long as you're diligent about pulling the wet spot out your barn won't smell like a barn and you'll have very few flies in the summer.  We actually use the StallShifter as one of our selling points for new boarders.  People are amazed how clean our stalls are.

The machine is very well built and in 9 years I've had very few breakdowns.  When a replacement part is needed, you'll get it right away.  Great customer service.

I know this sounds like a paid commercial for the StallShifter, but I assure you I have no relationship with with Brockwood Farms other than being a totally satisfied customer.  If you'd like additional information just email me and I'll be glad to answer any questions.

Anabel
Reply with quote  #8 

We no longer have our boarding business but after using a Stall Shi*fter for 7 years I would never clean a stall without one again. We cut our bedding costs significantly going from  one truckload a month to one every two months. My husband had tennis elbow and with the change in the labor type it was eliminated in 4 months. Everything they say on the website is true in my experience. The biggest problem we had was that after too many cleanings the machine would raise dust if we didn't re-bed them every once in a while. Our Shi*fter was one of the earliest models from 1998, we called it woody. They used to advertise here in Stable Management Magazine but now I only see them on line. They have the most expensive machine but it is high quality and sure pays for itself. The Link is http://www.brockwoodfarm.com

kandy j.
Reply with quote  #9 
I bought a shaker/sifter about three years ago and I love it.  I throw away a lot less shavings and when not "shaking", it is strong enough to scoop out the wet stuff.
Dave Howard
Reply with quote  #10 

Hi Sharon
I purchased the Shaker about a year ago. We do 27 stalls each day and would never go back to the manual way. There is a learning curve, when using a machine vs. manual. They do not like extra hay mixed in with the bedding, the shaker will work with hay but it is a much slower process than when horses finish their hay overnight. So we have saved on hay (added bonus) and our horses are not underweight we are just not wasting hay anymore. Another factor is the type of bedding you are using. The larger the shavings the slower the process will be. If you look at any of the videos for any of the machines they all use sawdust because it goes through the machine fast. I currently use three different bedding's but have started moving to a very fine shaving that I have been testing the last month and seems to work almost as fast as pelleted bedding. If you are a fan of pellets just be warned that if you don't get them broken down totally you will be playing goalie with your shovel to stop the pellets from going into the muck bucket with the manure. As with the other people that have commented you need to remove the wet spot first and then use the machine. We have one person that removes the wet spot and another that follows behind with the machine. The wet spot remover will be much faster so they also get to do water buckets and add bedding to horses that need it. We bed our horses very deep compared to most commercial boarding stables in the area. Before the shaker I was happy to do 3 to 4 stalls per hour with shaker we are averaging around 7 to 8 per hour with one less person. So to summarize, you will save hay, less wear and tear on your body (I can sleep at night now), bedding and should save on labor depending on size of your facility. As for breakdowns, the Shaker has never broken without help; it is easy to fix the few parts that can break. If you chose the Shaker just have Harry send you some more strapping pieces with the machine, I make my own but would never need them if hay bales weren't dropped on it or people wouldn't fall on it or horses backing into it. I chose the shaker after looking at all the products out there and thought their design was most like a muck fork and would work best with most bedding's on the market.  I am very pleased with my shaker – if you would like more info or ask some more questions just send an email. Sorry for being long winded.

Dave Howard

Newstead Equestrian Center LLC.

stacy
Reply with quote  #11 
are you all serious???? I am really asking because I just don't see how this thing can help much. I mean, you still have a lot of scooping/picking up to do...so I just can't see how it would be so awesome (unless it wheeled itself in the stalls and did everything). Our stalls (up to 29) are done daily and I can get in and out of one in 7-10 minutes. Just seems like a very expensive thing to get and then decide it was easier to just do myself. I have HORRIBLE tennis and golfers elbow in both...so would love to try one just to see. I do not mind spending the $$$ if it was worth it. (LOVE my TR3 rake and couldn't live without it!!) I hope there are a ton more responses to this thread!!!  
stacy
Reply with quote  #12 
ok, I am interested but not sold yet. I don't see how this helps. I mean, you still have to get out the wet, wheel the darned thing around with a muck bucket....empty the muck bucket (now I am involving my bad back, along with my bad elbows). Currently I have a Millcreek spreader, and a hoist on the bed of an old pu truck. My helper likes the truck better than spreader/tractor. We pitch everything into either one, then haul it out. I buy a shaker, then I have to wheel that around, along with a bucket? THEN lug the muck bucket? I am not trying to be an ass...I just don't see how this makes things so much easier? I can tell you, 29 stalls, cleaned every single day, most on matts, and I can get a stall done in 7-10 min depending on the horse. Do they offer a trial period or something? I sure would hate to get one and then have it become a rolling tack box or something. MORE INFO PLEASE!!!!
Cindy
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon1927
Has anybody tried using a mechanical manure sifter and/or shaker?  I have been looking into purchasing one but there are so many on the market...I'm not sure which model works the best.  There's the Stall Butler, The Shaker, The Poop Shaker, etc.  Do they really work and has anybody had any mechanical problems with them?
Cindy
Reply with quote  #14 
HI sharon just wanting to know if you are still interested
In a manure sifter? I have two that I purchased at a sale.
Thanks, Cindy



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon1927
Has anybody tried using a mechanical manure sifter and/or shaker?  I have been looking into purchasing one but there are so many on the market...I'm not sure which model works the best.  There's the Stall Butler, The Shaker, The Poop Shaker, etc.  Do they really work and has anybody had any mechanical problems with them?
Allyson
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon1927
Has anybody tried using a mechanical manure sifter and/or shaker?  I have been looking into purchasing one but there are so many on the market...I'm not sure which model works the best.  There's the Stall Butler, The Shaker, The Poop Shaker, etc.  Do they really work and has anybody had any mechanical problems with them?
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